Metsä Board's Lidloc paper cup innovation

Lifting the lid on Lidloc

​In many industries today, eliminating dependence upon fossil-fuel-based materials is a firm aim, but this is more challenging in some applications than others. Take the paper cup, for example. How could you possibly order a café latte on the move without a plastic lid to keep the hot liquid safely inside until you reach your destination?
4/2017 TEXT: IAN FENTON, PHOTOS: METSÄ BOARD
​Metsä Board’s Design & Innovation Director Cyril Drouet and his team of designers have arrived at a solution named Lidloc, which is destined to solve this problem and many others.

“The paper cup that we all know today hasn’t changed much since it was created,” he points out. “With the growing trend of beverages on the go, it has become even more important to have resource-saving solutions, use renewable materials, and enhance consumer convenience. This inspired our team to revamp the traditional design and arrive at a new solution, Lidloc.”
Metsä Board's Lidloc solution shows the logo for the most brand visibility

Flip your lid

What makes Lidloc so groundbreaking is its integration of the lid into the structure of the paperboard cup, meaning that a separate plastic lid is no longer needed. Folding the lid is designed to be quick, simple, and secure, a vast improvement upon a traditional plastic one.

Since the whole structure is made with paperboard, Lidloc also offers the possibility to print on the top of the lid, which provides an additional area for marketing messages.  An additional advantage of the design for brand owners is the fixed position of the cup’s artwork. On traditional cups, the brand logo can face in different directions depending on the lid position; with Lidloc, the logo on the cup always faces outwards, resulting in better brand visibility.

Metsä Board’s Design & Innovation Director Cyril Drouet

One-stop solution

Then there are the sustainability benefits. As a one-piece-construction paperboard cup with an integrated lid, recycling is much easier than in the case of one that incorporates plastic.

As Lidloc is not an open-top structure but a fully closed one, the overall stiffness of the design is greater than that of normal paper cups. This grants the opportunity to reduce the paperboard weight, and Cyril Drouet estimates a 20% drop compared to a traditional cup design.

“We wanted this innovation to bring new thinking into paperboard cup design,” he continues, “as we see that much can be done in this area. We’ve been happy to see that there is significant interest in it. It has become obvious that brand owners and convertors are very keen to learn about new, material-saving solutions like Lidloc.”


 

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